Non-UNWTO

4th T.20 Ministers´ Meeting (Mexico, 2012)

Location

Yucatán, Merida
Mexico
20° 58' 12" N, 89° 37' 12" W
Approve event: 
Yes
15 May 2012 - 16 May 2012
Location: 
20° 58' 12" N, 89° 37' 12" W

A major milestone in the T20 Initiative was achieved in 2012. For the first time, the G20 Leaders recognized in their Declaration tourism as a driver of economic growth and job creation and further committed to work on travel facilitation as a means to stimulate tourism growth.

“We recognize the role of travel and tourism as a vehicle for job creation, economic growth and development, and, while recognizing the sovereign right of States to control the entry of foreign nationals, we will work towards developing travel facilitation initiatives in support of job creation, quality work, poverty reduction and global growth.” G20 Declaration, Los Cabos, Mexico 2012

This historic declaration followed the work of the 4th T20 Ministers’ Meeting where “G20 Ministers of Tourism and other invited States work within the framework of their international commitments, together with International Organizations, to improve visa regimes and issuance processes without detriment to the authority or security of each State”. They also agreed to “further work to ensure fast, transparent and effective travel facilitation and visa programs based upon existing international commitments, for the purpose of increasing travel and tourism and job creation and encouraged “that the G20 recognizes the role of travel and tourism as a vehicle for job creation, economic growth and development, and commit to travel facilitation as a conduit for job creation, decent work, poverty alleviation and global  growth.” Declaration of the 4th T20 Ministers Meeting

 

4th T.20 Meeting Final Declaration

G.20 Leaders Declaration

 

T.20 Report: The impact of Visa Facilitation on Job Creation in the G20 Economies

 

 

Useful Links

 

Visa Facilitation can create five million additional jobs in G20 Economies - Merida, 17 May 2012

UNWTO welcomes T20 decision to advance visa facilitation - Merida, 22 May 2012

UNWTO and WTTC call on the G20 to use tourism's potential for job creation - Madrid/London, 16 June 2012

G20 recognizes Travel & Tourism as a driver of economic growth for the first time and commits to work on travel facilitation - Madrid/London, 20 June 2012

 

Category
Event type: 
Meeting
Related to: 
T.20
Non-UNWTO
Event or Session: 
This is a main event

2nd T.20 Ministers' Meeting (Republic of Korea, 2010)

“Tourism can make an important contribution to the initiatives that the G-20 is undertaking to achieve shared growth beyond crisis, particularly in terms of global job creation and the development agenda. The tourism sector stands ready to work towards the common objectives of strong, sustainable and balanced growth”.

3rd T.20 Ministers' Meeting (France, 2011)

Location

Paris
France
Approve event: 
Yes
24 October 2011 - 25 October 2011
Location: 


“Tourism is one of the first economic activities which took back the road of the growth at the world level. In 2010, the number of international tourists increased by 7 % to reach 940 million tourists. This recovery has been confirmed at the beginning of 2011 with a 5 % progress during the first eight months of the year, with the prospect to reach one billion of cross border tourists by 2012.
Considering the significant economic and social potential of tourism for the global economy, employment and sustainable development, the G20 members to register the importance and impact of tourism as a topic of discussion in the coming years summits”.


'Paris Declaration' (3rd T.20 Ministers´Meeting, France, 2011)

 


 


Background Reports

 

The Indirect Impact of Tourism: An Economic Analysis

 

Executive Summary

The main purpose of this report is to show the importance and the role of the indirect economic effects of tourism on growth and GDP, employment and foreign trade. Tourism's role in the economy is often perceived as being limited to the hospitality industry (cafes, hotels and restaurants) and outbound and inbound travel agencies and carriers, which form the leading service sector in many countries. However, the economic impact of tourism is much greater, since many inputs are needed in order to produce tourism and leisure services, spanning the whole range of farm, agrifood and industrial production, including the production of capital goods as well as construction and public works.
Highlighting these indirect impacts of tourism is regarded as a priority by the T20 countries and the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), which has produced methodological tools such as Tourism Satellite Accounts (TSAs). Assessing the economic impacts of tourism helps to inform the conduct of stimulus policies in response to international economic and financial crises. It shows that tourism can become a driver of recovery, fostering stable and sustainable economic growth, provided that sectoral support policies are implemented taking the central role of tourism into account. 

Full Report - 'The Indirect Impact of Tourism: An Economic Analysis'

 


UNWTO Study - Exploring the Full Economic Impact of Tourism for Policy Making - Extending the Use of the Tourism Satellite Account through Macroeconomic Analysis Tools

Executive Summary

The Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) is a unique tool now available to policymakers in many countries to document the direct Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and employment contributions of tourism to national economies.
Policymakers are also interested in estimating other aspects of the economic impact of tourism by using TSA data to estimate the income and government revenue generated by Tourism Consumption and incorporating the secondary effects of this spending on the economy. These secondary effects “multiply” the impacts of tourism through engaging additional suppliers and households in servicing Tourism Expenditure. Moreover, policymakers seek to understand how external and policy-induced “shocks” to the economy will affect tourism‟s contributions.
Three macroeconomic analysis tools are available for policy-makers to extend the understanding of the economic benefits of Tourism Expenditure: the Input-Output Model, the Social Accounting Matrix and the Computable General Equilibrium Model. This paper summarizes each of these in turn, describes their relationships, discusses strengths and weaknesses, and suggests how TSA data can be used as input in deriving estimates of the overall economic impact of tourism. Such analysis is the precondition for an accurate understanding of tourism as part of a national economy, enabling the integration of tourism into broader economic policy.

Full Report - ' Exploring the Full Economic Impact of Tourism for Policy Making'



Useful Links

Ministers of Tourism of major world economies call on decision-makers to use tourism to stimulate the economy - 27 October 2011


 

Category
Event type: 
Meeting
Related to: 
T.20
Non-UNWTO
Event or Session: 
This is a main event

International Tourism: First results of 2011 confirm consolidation of growth

Location

Madrid
Spain
PR No.: 
PR11041
11 May 11

International tourist arrivals grew by close to 5% during the first months of 2011, consolidating the 7% rebound registered in 2010. According to the April Interim Update of the UNWTO World Tourism Barometer, growth was positive in all world (sub)regions during January and February 2011, with the exception of the Middle East and North Africa. South America and South Asia led growth (both at +15%), followed by Subsaharan Africa (+13%) and Central and Eastern Europe (+12%).

Asia and the Pacific, the region with one of the fastest growth rates in 2010, saw its pace of growth slow down (+6%), although from a very strong performance the previous year. Results were better than expected forEurope (+6%), boosted by the recovery of Central and Eastern Europe, and the temporary redistribution of travel to destinations in Southern and Mediterranean Europe due to developments in North Africa (-9%) and the Middle East (-10%).